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Page with question from mdg9 and space to add your answers

Page history last edited by Ebenezer Prah 8 years, 8 months ago

 

 

 

What is your community doing or could be doing better to improve the maternal health and in turn infant health?

 

  • Is there prenatal  care and training (like Lamaze classes etc.) available to all mothers-to-be in your community?
  • Is there a trained person (midwife or doctor) attending the birth?
  • Do mothers receive postpartum care (physical exams, emotional support and infant monitoring)?
  • Does the government supply the opportunity for mothers to get this care or is it the family who pays?  Do infants or mother receive care if an emergency happens during the birthing process?

 


Answer from mdg1

 

 

In the capital there are some special classes called Lamaze classes. Although, they are very expensive and very few mothers have heard about them. Births are assisted by midwives and are placed in special sections. After giving birth, mothers and children remain a couple of days in the hospital. In this period of time, children are vaccinated.

 

 


Answer from mdg2

 

XXX

 

 

 

 


Answer from mdg3

 

I think  that our community should even open more centers where mothers go to check to see if the pregnancy goes well to inquire whether the child is healthy and so mother and child health will be in good condition.

 

 

Yes, in our community there are training courses and prenatal care of mothers, such as Motherhood Center, First Baby, Active Center, Lamaze Association but not all mothers attend these courses because they lack money and because they consider that don’t need  prenatal education.

 

 

 Yes ,there to attend the birth  are people trained to participate in the birth,obligatory must be a doctor assisted by a midwife. They are very well trained in this field.

 

 

Mothers receive postpartum care ranging from prenatal training where learn to move and how they can do physical exercises. Future mothers are emotionally supported by family but can resort to a psychologist who guide them as well. Infant monitoring is going to medical control to a certain period of time, where the doctor saysv that  your pregnancy progresses well and to see the stage where is  the fetus .(by ultrasound)

 

 

Government allows mothers to have a place to go for health care for the child but on all tests and inspections are paid by familie.In emergency  mothers can receive  medical care.

 

 

 

 


Answer from mdg4

 

 

Respond to MDG 9

 

Questions:

What is community doing or could be doing better to improve the maternal health and in turn infant health?

1. Is the prenatal care and training(like Lamaze classes etc.) available to all mothers-to-be in your community?

2. Is there a trained person (midwife or doctor) attending the birth?

3. Do mothers receive postpartum care (physical exams, emotional support and infant monitoring)?

4. Does the government supply the opportunity for mothers to get this care or is it the family who pays? Do infants or mother receive care if an emergency happens during the birthing process?

 

Hallo dear, MDG9!

Pregnant women receiving prenatal care are the percentage of women attended at least once during pregnancy by skilled health personnel for reasons related to pregnancy. This page includes a historical data chart, news and forecast for pregnant women receiving prenatal care (%) in Ukraine. Ukraine is a middle-income country located in Eastern Europe.

                    

In our country ideally, prenatal care should start before you get pregnant. If you're planning a pregnancy, see your health care provider for a complete checkup. He or she can do routine testing to make sure you're in good health and that you don't have any illnesses or other conditions that could affect your pregnancy.  If you're already being treated for a chronic condition, such as diabetes, asthma, hypertension (high blood pressure), a heart problem, allergies, lupus (an inflammatory disorder that can affect several body systems), depression, or some other condition, you should talk to your doctor about how it could affect your pregnancy. Your health care provider may refer you to a doctor with expertise in high-risk pregnancies. 

                                  

Pregnant women are typically cared for by: obstetricians, obstetricians/gynecologists, family practitioners, or certified nurse-midwife. Ukraine has programs to give financial, medical and other information, advice and other services important for a healthy pregnancy. The links Medical Help for Pregnant Women, Mothers and Children and Financial Assistance for Pregnant Women, Mothers and Children will put you in touch with many valuable resources.  Child welfare agency for each state, Department of Health can provide nutrition information and help as well as help with pregnancy and post-pregnancy concerns. Medicaid in each state can help you with answers about free services offered to you and your child.

                 

 State Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program provides free or low-cost mammogram and Pap test. Women, Infants and Children  Program provides help with food, nutritional counseling, and access to health services for women, infants and children.

  

Best wishes yours MDG4!                       



 

 

 


Answer from mdg5

We were really surprised by the facts we discovered about our country when we were doing our research! The gynaecologist told us that:

1. Medicines for pregnant women are free in Latvia. In hospitals are organised excursions around the hospital, the wards are being renowated. Preganat girls who are younger that 18 don't need to pay patient fee.

2. Special lectures and tests are organised. Lectures take place 2 times a week and they are free.
County guarantees concrete benefits, if preganat women don't work, the country gives them dole money.

3. A midwife and a doctor obligatory attend every child birth. If you pay, you have better conditions and attitude of staff.

4. After the child birth, pregnant woman doesn't need to pay for medical treatment 42 weeks after child birth.

5. Country provides free medicaments and analysis for preganant women and newborn children. All medical care is free till the child becomes 18.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Answer from mdg6

 

 

The government has put in place equipments and employed better and proper procedures to improve safe delivery.

Pre-natal care in our country is made free and the pregnant women are given special treatment to improve pre-natal care.

There are trained doctors and mid-wives in our country.

Mothers do receive postpartum care in our country.

Pre-natal care is free but post-natal care requires a small amount of money from the family. All mothers are entitled to any support when any complication arises.

 

 

 


Answer from mdg7

 

 

 

 


Answer from mdg8

 

Q: What is your community doing or could be doing better to improve the maternal health and in turn infant health?

Answer: People from all communities are very careful about the maternal health. The government is very careful about this issue. There are many maternity and baby care centers in the country even in the villages. The doctors and nurses are trained for supporting the mother at a crucial time. There are health workers who support the conceiving mothers all through the period of ten months. The children are given vaccines of different deadly debases. International organizations help us in this regards.

 Q: Is there prenatal care and training (like Lamaze classes etc.) available to all mothers-to-be in your community?

Answer: Educated parents are careful about these important issues. There are some rural people. They need training. There are families who book hospital beds earlier so that the child bearing mother may not face any major problem. In many families the parents of the child bearing mothers take the responsibility of nursing and taking care for a period of six month until the baby is a little grown up.

Q: Is there a trained person (midwife or doctor) attending the birth?

Answer: There are health workers available. In villages, we call a DAIMA who take care of the pregnant mother at the time of child birth. Besides, in hospitals, rural or city, there are doctors and nurses.

Q: Do mothers receive postpartum care (physical exams, emotional support and infant monitoring)?

Answer: In our culture, pregnant women are treated with respect and care. They are taken extra care. The relatives visit the house of the pregnant mothers and offer them different kinds of tasty foods especially cooked for them. They are regularly taken to doctors for check ups.They are given relax from household works and they are kept away from risky works.

 

Q: Does the government supply the opportunity for mothers to get this care or is it the family who pays?  Do infants or mother receive care if an emergency happens during the birthing process?

Answer: The government pays for the government service holders. Others are paid by them. But if needed, Government hospitals are supposed to give supports.Yes, the always receive.

 

 

 

 


Answer from mdg10

 

XXX

What is your community doing or could be doing better to improve the maternal health and in turn infant health?

 

       Is there prenatal care and training (like Lamaze classes etc.) available to all mothers-to-be in your community?

       Is there a trained person (midwife or doctor) attending the birth?

A: No, most midwives practice in hospitals or out-of-hospital birth centers because those are the locations where most women give birth. It is true; however, that almost all home births are attended by midwives, who are experts in normal birth.

In all countries outside North and South America, midwives provide most of the maternity care, but in the United States less than 10 percent of all births are attended by midwives. The percentage is growing rapidly, however, because midwifery care is highly satisfying to women and has an excellent track record in terms of safety and cost.

 

Do mothers receive postpartum care (physical exams, emotional support and infant monitoring)?

Children of Employed Mothers.

Care for the children of employed mothers emerged as a major problem as the war production program gathered momentum. The number of women working in war industries rose from 1,400,000 in December 1941 to something like 4,500,000 by the end of 1942, according to estimates of the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Bureau of Employment Security, with further large increases in prospect. How many of these women are responsible for the care of young children is not known, but sample surveys carried on in war production plants and defense communities showed a large number of children of working mothers for whom no satisfactory care was available. Instances were reported of young children left during the day without care, of children kept out of school to take care of younger children, of children taken sick in school who could not be sent home because there was no one there, of boys and girls drifting into delinquency because of lack of parental supervision and the absence of community facilities for wholesome recreation.

Recognizing that a mother's first concern, in war as in peace, should be the health and welfare of her child, the War Manpower Commission issued a directive stating that mothers of young children should not be recruited for employment while other sources of labor are available, but that suitable care should be provided for the children of mothers who are employed. The Children's Bureau, which had been concerned with community planning for day care of children of mothers employed in war production since the summer of 1941, set up a day-care section which offers consultation service to states and local communities. Federal funds for the promotion, coordination, and administration of child-care programs were made available through the Office of Defense Health and Welfare Services under plans submitted by state welfare departments and recommended for approval by the Children's Bureau and plans submitted by state education departments and recommended for approval by the Office of Education. By the middle of January, 24 plans for services to children of working mothers had been approved — 12 submitted by welfare departments and 12 submitted by education departments. The services offered in individual communities vary according to need. They include counseling service for mothers who are employed or are seeking employment; foster-family day care; day-care centers providing all-day care for children 2 to 5 years of age, inclusive; homemaker service; nursery schools and extended school services for children who need care and supervision before and after regular school hours; and day and vacation camps. At least 34 states have organized state-wide committees on day care, many of them being subcommittees of the children's committee of the state defense council, and more than 250 local committees have been formed. Surveys of local needs had been made in more than 300 communities.

Social Security Program.

The basic maternal and child-welfare programs under the Social Security Act, which the states carry on in cooperation with the Children's Bureau, were maintained during the year, with adaptation of the services to meet wartime needs so far as possible.

The President in August recommended that the Act be amended to authorize the appropriation of additional funds to meet the special needs of mothers and children arising from war conditions, but although bills were introduced for this purpose, no action had been taken on them when Congress adjourned in December.

Child-Health and Maternity Care.

The need for maternal and child-health services was increased by the shortages of physicians, nurses, and hospital facilities, especially in war production areas. The services provided by state health departments with the help of Federal funds include prenatal clinics and child-health conferences under medical supervision; medical examinations of school children; public-health-nursing services for mothers and children; dental services; and consultation services in nutrition. A feature which received increasing emphasis in a number of states was the payment of physicians and hospitals for delivery and postpartum care of mothers and for care of sick children. Special efforts were made to provide obstetric care for the wives of men in the armed forces

The importance of immunizing children against contagious diseases as a preventive measure in wartime was stressed by the President in his May Day-Child Health Day proclamation. A widespread campaign for immunization of children 9 months of age and over was carried on with the cooperation of the state health departments during the spring of 1942, with the result that the number of vaccinations against smallpox given under their supervision almost trebled and immunizations against diphtheria more than doubled as compared with the previous spring.

Orthopedic surgeons were in great demand for service with the armed forces. State agencies administering the program for crippled children endeavored to meet the loss of staff surgeons by sending children to other states for treatment and by postponing certain types of corrective work. The number of crippled children on state registers increased 11 per cent during the year, reaching 340,692 on June 30, 1942.

 

      Does the government supply the opportunity for mothers to get this care or is it the family who pays?  Do infants or mother receive care if an emergency happens during the birthing process? Medicaid programs provide medical coverage for some people with low incomes, especially children and pregnant women. Depending on individual state eligibility requirements, Medicaid may also provide coverage for adults with certain disabilities. State programs that meet federal guidelines qualify to receive federal funding that pays for most of the program’s cost. These guidelines use federal statistics that define the poverty level (minimum level of income below which households are considered poor) to help states determine which low-income families are eligible for Medicaid.

 

 

 

 


Answer from mdg11

 

XXX

 

 

 

 


Answer from mdg12

 

What does the Canadian Government do to support pregnant women?

   We discovered many things the Canadian Government does to support pregnant women. For example, they provide benefits for newly immigrated mothers and teenage mothers. We found ourselves contemplating the statistics about pregnancy within Canada, and the stereotypes surrounding these mothers. Accordingly, we created a variety of questions designed to extend our knowledge on the topic based specifically on what we both didn’t know and were interested in learning.

 

   Our first question concerned whether or not the government provides any type of cash benefit for mothers. We discovered that in 2011, a new baby also delivers a tax credit of up to $1000, even if the child was born late in the year. There is also a monthly benefit for each child depending on the parent’s income.

   Our second question concerned what else the government actually does to support mothers. We learned that there are specific programs sculpted to aid pregnant women and new mothers facing challenging life circumstances. They provide nutrition counselling both before and after the pregnancy. There are public health nurses who visit new mothers. There are also several on-line resources that women can access. The government also supports one parent with maternity leave. One parent can take up to one year off and receive just over 50% of their salary from the government. The government also offers a program so that parents can save for their child’s future education without paying tax on the money used for this purpose.

 

   Our third question concerned the actual infant mortality rates within our country. Death rates in Canada of infants have been dropping. The infant mortality rate is 4.9%.

 

   Our final question regarded statistics once more, but based on the age groups of  pregnant women. We discovered that in 2008 the average age of mothers at the birth of their children was 29- an increase of 3 years over the last three decades. We also learned that nearly half (49.6) of all mothers who gave birth in 2008 were 30 years+. Births to teenagers have decreased over the last 3 decades from 30 births per 1,000 in 1974 to 12.0 in 2008.

 

 A further question is to look at the Canadian experience with teen pregnancies and determine what has caused the change and if that experience might be useful in other places?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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